COP28

As COP28 takes place in Dubai, we reflect on why world leaders must work together quickly to tackle the climate crisis.

As COP28 begins in Dubai, the impacts of the climate crisis and the toll on human lives and the planet is undeniable.

We do not have the luxury of time, or indecision. The leaders at COP28 must work collaboratively to build strategies with tangible and meaningful outcomes for people facing the immediate and long-term consequences of the climate crisis.

Every day, the human made climate crisis is displacing families, destroying homes, and threatening lives. During COP28, we urge world leaders to keep in mind every person, every home, and every community behind the statistics.

At ShelterBox, we witness firsthand the devastating consequences of the human made climate crisis, where extreme weather and a warming climate is causing mass displacement and uprooting people from their homes and livelihoods.

Our teams frequently respond to disasters that have been exacerbated by the climate crisis, providing shelter and supporting people to rebuild their lives.

It is people living in countries who have contributed least to the crisis, who are bearing the brunt of these changes.

As the discussions and negotiations unfold throughout COP28, the people behind the statistics and scientific data must be kept at the very forefront of decision-making. Every decision made and every commitment promised must prioritise the wellbeing of the people who suffer the devastating impacts of disasters around the world. We cannot afford to lose sight of the human side of climate change.

Man crouching in front of flood water in Pakistan
Abdul's home and livelihood was washed away in the devastating flood in Pakistan in 2022. Over 33 million people were impacted by the floods.
Woman sitting outside of a temporary shelter in Somalia
Nurta and her family were forced to leave their home due to a severe lack of food and water caused by the drought in Somalia.

Our commitment to supporting people left without shelter after disaster compels us to push for a shift in language and understanding when discussing extreme weather. By not framing disasters as ‘natural’, we recognise that the impact extreme weather like storms, flooding, and drought have on people and our planet is often because of decisions made by people with the most power.

We are urging the world leaders to make sure COP28 is the turning point, making tough decisions and taking bold action that will help overcome the biggest challenge facing humanity, protect futures, save lives, and the planet.

Disasters are not natural

Be part of the conversation

Millions of people in some of the most vulnerable places around the world are facing the challenges of the climate crisis head-on.

We’re committed to reaching communities that urgently need support, but we can’t do it alone.

Learn more


Climate Change Hub

Millions of people are losing theirs homes to climate change. As a disaster relief charity, we need to be ready to give people the life-changing support they need, when they need it.

Why disasters are not natural

Read why we no longer use the term ‘natural disasters’, the definition of a disaster, and how we have come to change our language.

How does climate change affect disasters?

Climate change is a humanitarian crisis. Find out key stats about climate change, how it affects disasters and people, and what we’re doing about it.